The Weald of Kent, Surrey and Sussex
George Courthope
Printer friendly version

George Courthope was born in 1616, and was the only son of Sir George Courthope, of Whiligh, Ticehurst, a Commissioner of the Alienation Office. After spending some time at the Merchant Taylors' and Westminster Schools, George Courthope went to Oxford, and on leaving the University he travelled extensively across Europe. He married Elizabeth Hawes, a daughter of his father's second wife by her first husband. During the Protectorate he was summoned to appear before Cromwell's Council on a charge of having supplied the King and his family with money, and the charge was, no doubt, to an extent, true, but the trial was adjourned sine die and never completed. On the restoration of Charles II. he was present at the great banquet given by the King at Windsor Castle, being in attendance on the Earl of Northumberland, Lord Lieutenant of Sussex. That same morning he received the honour of knighthood, and the King remitted the fee of £100 usually demanded from those raised to this dignity, and also granted Sir George pardon for having sat as M.P. for East Grinstead in the Protectorate Parliament. Sir George subsequently sat in several Parliaments for Sussex constituencies and finally resigned in consequence of severe illness. His death occurred at Whiligh in 1685.


See also The History of East Grinstead published in 1906.
Date
Type
Information
Source
 
1616
Born
 
 
1685
Died
 

No ancestor's report
No descendent's report
Courthope, Courtehope, Courthop, Courthopp, Curtupe individual records

The Weald is at  Database version 12.4 which has ongoing updates to the 379,932 people; 9,000 places; 613 maps; 3,308 pictures, engravings and photographs; and 244 books loaded in the previous version

Fasthosts web site  
ODNB  
British Libarary  
High Weald  
Sussex Family History Group  
Sussex Record Society  
Sussex Archaeological Society  
Kent Archaeological Society  
Mid Kent Marriages  
Ancestry  
Genes Reunited  
International Genealogical Index  
National Archives  

Top
of the
page